Male Greek Names

Male Greek names are so many and different.

In Greece there are male names from the antiquity – some of the ancient Greek male names are truly amazing and interesting – from the Christian tradition, or local Greek customs.

As with female Greek names, people tend to give their children the name of the grandfather – the first born son usually takes the name of his father’s father, although this tradition is more evident in rural areas and smaller towns.

In the cities of Greece, this tradition is definitely alive but especially when it comes to young couples, choosing the name for the baby boy is a matter of personal preference. Sometimes young couples choose to avoid family names and give their child a name they both like.

Common Male Greek Names

men in greece

According to a recent study, the most common male Greek name is Giorgos (George). It is estimated that 11% of male Greeks bear the name Giorgos (which practically means that 550,000 men are named this way). Giorgos is indeed the most common male name everywhere in Greece, both in the mainland and the islands.

The second most common name is Yannis (or Giannis), equally popular in the islands and mainland as well. Konstantinos (and its main nickname Kostas) is the third most popular name, while Demetrios and Nikolaos are the ones completing the top 5 Greek male names in terms of popularity.

It is said that name Demetrios is more popular in Northern Greece than in southern parts of the country, which is understandable, considering that St Demetrios is much celebrated and honored in cities like Thessaloniki and other northern towns and regions. Nikolaos, on the other hand, is more common in islands, since the name refers to the patron saint of the sailors and naval people.

Names Panagiotis, Alexandros, Vassilis, Thanassis and Christos are also very popular male names in Greece. All these names refer mostly to the Christian religion (although some of them are originated from the ancient times). The most popular and common male names are Orestis, Foivos and Aris, although lately ancient Greek names are becoming increasingly popular again, and it is not unusual to meet men with “weird” or not so common ancient names.

Use of Male Greek Names

Once upon a time it was pretty common to use diminutives and nicknames, replacing in some way the main male name. For instance, a man named Ioannis was called Giannis, a man named Konstantinos was called Kostas, a man named Anastasios was called Tassos or Sakis and so on. Today, many couples try to keep the main name, rather than calling their sons with some of those nicknames – of course some names are still used, such as Giannis, but it is not that uncommon to find men using the initial name Ioannis , which was rather weird a few decades ago.

In some cases the name depends on the region of origin of the boy, as in areas like Crete , Rhodes or Epirus, locals tend to give their male children names with local color, such as Manoussos (in Crete), Tsampikos (in Rhodes), Agis or Giourkas (in Epirus). These are small examples, but the variety of male Greek names is quite vague and vast, influenced by factors such as tradition, local customs and eras.

13 Responses to Male Greek Names

  1. Blake. September 11, 2012 at 15:45 #

    I am Seeking a very interesting and honest Greek woman for marriage and life settlement, I need someone to give me the clue of how to find, i am 57years and search from 48years above, Send me email if you’re Greek woman and interested, Sgtblake@yahoo.com

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  2. this day in history September 4, 2011 at 19:38 #

    Name of Greek heroes for akboy a few post ago (just a few of them) Iraklis (Hercules) Thiseas, Miltiadis, Leonidas, Achilleas, Odysseas

  3. Giorgios June 26, 2011 at 18:28 #

    hey people ))) I am half Greek and half Armenian my Armenian name is Gevorg and Greek name is Giorgios but more than 15 years I am living in Armenia and everyone call me with my Armenian name shortly it is Gev!
    I would like to know Georgios how will sound shortly?

  4. Marlene I. Garcia June 24, 2011 at 00:46 #

    Does anybody out there had an ancestor named Nikolaos Bakhos, Bakchos or Bochas from Lamia Greece who came to Matamoros Mexico in the early 1800s

    • Keisha (Bochas) Murrey July 2, 2011 at 19:58 #

      Hi,

      I actually have ancestors from Greece (On my mom’s father’s side.. However I didn’t know my great- great- great Grandpa’s name) But I do know he brought over 2 sons and a daughter before heading back with one of the sons. I am a great- great Grandaughter of the son who stayed behind. I know I have family in Matamoros, Mexico. My Great- Great Aunt (the daughter that stayed behind) opened a Pharmacy in Corpus Christi, Tx which is where me and my siblings were born. My family still live in Corpus Christi to this day. I have proof such as my birth certificate, Texas state ID, etc. to prove I am a Bochas. you can email me at bochaskeisha@yahoo.com if you would like to talk.

      Thank you,

  5. akboy February 2, 2011 at 05:25 #

    Does anyone know a good name for a hero? (has to be greek)

    • Katia February 2, 2011 at 16:41 #

      Are we talking about a comic hero? Or the hero of a book?
      I can suggest you names Milon, or Miron, which are ancient Greek names. They are not as popular names as others, but they have their significance in ancient Greek mythology and history. If you can be a little more specific on what kind of hero we are talking about, I can also give you some more ideas.

  6. Joss April 29, 2010 at 14:54 #

    Does anyone know anything about the surname Kontsoumides (or variant spellings of that)?

  7. jacob March 23, 2010 at 10:06 #

    On another note, my Dutch parents had no idea that there can be a few versions of the same personal name in Greek, and they called me Yiannis, just because they had a Greek friend of their’s who had this name, so there is a precedent…

  8. jacob March 23, 2010 at 09:55 #

    Yet, I can give some examples of male Greeks who bear official demotike names – Yiannoulis Fakinos (a football player), Yiannis Ritsos (a poet), Yiannoulis Halepas (a sculptor), or am I mistaken?
    Is there a trend of giving the newly-born dimotiki names to avoid mess, or the Greeks still strongly stick to the tradition?

  9. yannis February 11, 2010 at 21:14 #

    Normally they are not used and the original forms of the names are always preferrable: Ioannis for Giannis, Georgios for Giorgos, Emmanouil for Manolis, Nikolaos for Nikos, etc.

  10. jacob January 16, 2010 at 09:28 #

    I wonder if demotike names, such as Giannis, Giorgos or Kostas can be used in official papers…

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